How to manage the brand perception-gap.

Brands are about perceptions rather than reality, because they are primarily concerned with emotion more than logic.

Perceptions and attributions may be constructed from early experiences of a brand or by received information. Often, that information is also emotionally constructed. It may have been channelled through peer groups, respected friends or colleagues, or sympathetic media.

Large brands may spend a great deal of resource trying to understand perceptions in the hope of being able to correct any gaps between perception and ‘reality’. Modifying such perception gaps may be a near impossible task as attributions people have constructed themselves are often not accessible to logical argument – they may require significant rebuilding of the brand’s emotional capital.

Changing perceptions can be a long and difficult process – often outside the scope of small brands.

All may not be as it seems.

A key word however is ‘understanding’. Perceptions do not always have to be changed, but they must be understood.

One of the most important perception gaps for small and medium enterprises is that between internal and external perceptions.

Smaller businesses tend to be driven by small close-knit teams with a shared vision of what their business is all about. They are very close to their product or service and have a deep understanding of its operation. However, there may be a significant gap between that and the benefits customers perceive in dealing with the organisation.

The company may believe its key strength lies in the range of products and services – customers may put quality of service top of their list.

A business may see its pricing as a vital advantage – for clients it may be same-day delivery.

Customers may relate to the image of a charismatic CEO while the business believes they success depends upon innovative solutions.

It’s easy to see that this perception gap can lead to businesses devoting costly resource on developing and promoting the wrong dimensions of their brand. Conversely, identifying and building on strengths as perceived by clients can be an effective and rewarding action.

Dealing with the gap

So, how do we identify the perception gap? The answer is relatively simple.

First clarify within the organisation what is seen as the major brand strengths and reasons why clients should make their choices.

Next determine what are the strengths as perceived by customers and other stakeholders. How do we do that? Simple – just ask them – surprisingly, people will usually just tell you.

A very simple device is the customer service survey. Ask questions designed to probe people’s views of the company and services. These could include a list of adjectives with the question: ‘Whch of these best describes ABC?’ Similarly, a list of benefits – price, range, customer service, reliability, track record etc. – asking the client to rank them in order of importance.

Ask a range of questions and keep as many as possible quantitative – i.e. score 1 – 10 or rank these qualities. This allows you to measure answers from a number of respondents. Eep the qualitative questions, ‘What do you think…’ To a minimum.

Your last task is to compare the customers’ perception with the company’s. There may be some obvious gaps that need addressing or some small adjustments. Remember, it’s more effective and easier to adjust your brand communications to be in tune with customer perceptions.

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Will brand values be as unpredictable as political values in Europe?

Does branding in Europe have a unique flavour?

I’m going to be looking forward with interest to the Transform conference, given that ‘Brand Europe’ itself seems to have undergone significant changes. Are Europeans’ values shifting – paricularly those of consumers?

Brand management seems likely to have become a contentious issue, closely linked with corporate governance, which has the potential for challenge by value perceptions.

Brand evolution in Europe – Transform magazine

At the 2015 Transform Conference Europe, influence, reputation and creativity were key topics. Sustainability as a core brand positioning laid the groundwork for the current rise in purpose …

Read more …

Volkswagen embedded brand values

Volkswagen and brand contagion

A brand is a social construct and as such it does not exist in a vacuum.  It is socially and historically contextual. A brand narrative draws upon these contexts and informs our understanding and our emotional relationships that they engender.

The recent issues facing Volkswagen bring these connections into sharp focus. When we consider the brand values of VW, we see them as shared and deeply embedded in those of the German auto industry in general. They include technical and engineering expertise, quality of manufacture and attention to detail. These qualities we see shared and associated with other individual brands such as Mercedes and BMW.

If many VW values are shared and embedded in our perceptions of German car manufacture, they also draw upon what the world may see as German national values. These may include probity, rule-following, bureaucratic fussiness and openness.

It’s easy to see how VW has enjoyed and built its brand persona upon the wider perceptions of both the industry and national values.

However, just as the brand may suffer from any failure in the encompassing brand values – the converse is also true. VW’s apparent lapse in standards, running contrary to our perception of their values, also has repercussions for the German auto industry as a whole. We may question the brand values of the whole cohort.

As the ripples spread out, long-held impressions of German national principles and brand dimensions cannot avoid damage. This in turn may affect and cause us to questions those values as attributed to other businesses and brands closely identified with national characteristics.

It is a salutary reminder that no brand is an island and value it may acquire or inherit from a sector, industry or a nation is synergic. All may prosper or suffer damage from the actions of others.